Yokoso! Japan - 通訳ガイド的日本再発見

海外から日本に来る外国人観光客の方々に、通訳ガイドの視点から、日本の良さを伝えたい…日頃見慣れた風景もあらためて見れば新鮮に映る、そんな視点で日本を再発見し、通訳ガイドの方もすぐ活用できるように、英語で紹介します。

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ホイサムジャイ

Author:ホイサムジャイ
放浪癖あり(笑)。好きなTV番組は「モヤモヤさまぁ~ず」「ちい散歩」「タモリ倶楽部」「ぶらり途中下車の旅」などなど。。。良く言えば「自由人」、悪く言えば「鉄砲玉」(←出たら戻って来んのかい!)

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上記の広告は1ヶ月以上更新のないブログに表示されています。
新しい記事を書く事で広告が消せます。

毎度のことなんですが。。。外国からのお客様が何に「食いつく」のか(笑)
で、本日はこのところ観光客がとみに増加しているあの場所へ。

向かっているのは「鉄道博物館」(^-^)b

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そのために乗る鉄道がコレですね~(嬉)
なんか、懐かしいような感じを覚えます^^

実はこのニューシャトル、何種類かのデザインがありまして。。。

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んんんっ。。。てことはこのデザインが一番基本なんですねっ!
あ、あ、あ・・・出発しちゃいました(T-T)仕方ありません、次の電車を待ちましょ。

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ほぉ~っ、今度は一番新しいタイプが来ましたね~^^



・・・で、現地到着!

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鉄道博物館までの道すがらにも、色々面白いオブジェがありますね(^0^)/

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ではこのあたりで、いつものやつを。
本日はその「鉄道博物館」で、いってみましょう!

The Railway Museum is located in Saitama, Japan, which opened on 14 October 2007. It was built and is operated by the East Japan Railway Culture Foundation, a non-profit affiliate of the East Japan Railway Company. It consists of a 19,800 square meters building on a site covering 42,500 square meters, with a display area 9,500 square meters in size.

The museum features about 30 railway cars, train cab simulators, railway model dioramas, mini trains, storage for artefacts and books, video booths, a multi-purpose hall, a gallery balcony, a cafeteria, a museum shop, and a research room.

The museum places emphasis on learning through interactive experiences and is mainly divided into two zones: the history zone and the learning zone. The history zone recounts the history of railway technology with the help of trains that were in service in the past. In the learning zone, visitors can gain knowledge of the principles and mechanisms of railway with the use of actual parts and models. The tour of the museum takes roughly two hours with extra time for interactive exhibits.

The present Railway Museum is the successor to the Transportation Museum in Chiyoda, Tokyo. This museum also opened as the Railway Museum under the elevated railway track near Tokyo Station celebrating the beginning of the 50th year of the railways in Japan on 14 October 1921. In 1936, the Railway Museum was relocated to the new facility built in the place of former building of Manseibashi Station, which station continued to operate until 1943 as an accessory of the museum. The museum was renamed to the Transportation Museum in 1948 to cover various means of transportation while the railway was still the main exhibit of the museum. On 14 May 2006 the museum was closed pending a move to the new Railway Museum in Saitama.

・・・という感じでしょうか。

ではいよいよ入場しますねっ・・・って、あぁぁっ、しまった!もうGW休暇に突入しちゃうんですよね~w(゜o゜)w
大変恐縮ですが、ワタシはこのままココで過ごしますので、更新はGW明けってことに m(_ _)m

ご覧いただいてる皆様も、どうぞそのままお待ちください。
くれぐれも「途中下車」は、なさらないようにお願いします。。。

・・・そう、乗りかかった船。。。じゃなくて「電車」ですので(笑)


というわけで、次回の更新は連休明けになります。
鉄道博物館の魅力をいっぱいお届け・・・できるといいっすね~
スポンサーサイト

まもなくGWですね~。
ワタシはといえば、恒例のネタ拾いルートを模索しております(笑)

で、やってきたのは・・・もうタイトルで想像ついたと思いますが「東京スカイツリー」。
そうそう、ちょうどひと月ほど前に、日本一高い建物になったんでしたよねっw(^-^)w

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いま350m位の高さにある「ほぼ中間地点」に取り掛かっているんですね~。で、完成するとその高さは「634m」になるそうです。。。「ムサシ」っすね(一_一☆)

・・・まあこれ以上ふくらませようがないので(笑)いつものやつを。
本日は「東京スカイツリー」で、いってみましょう!

The Tokyo Sky Tree is a Broadcasting, Restaurant, and Observation Tower under construction in the Narihirabashi/Oshiage area of Sumida ward in Tokyo, Japan. As of 29 March 2010 it is the tallest artificial structure in Japan. When completed, the tower will have a height of 634.00 m (2,080 ft). The present Tokyo Tower (333 m) is not tall enough to give complete digital terrestrial television broadcasting coverage, due to the construction of many nearby high-rise buildings in the central part of the Tokyo Metropolis.

The project is being led by Tobu Railway and a group of six terrestrial broadcasters (headed by public broadcaster NHK). Construction of the tower is scheduled to be completed by December 2011, with the public opening in spring 2012. The completed structure will be the highlight of a massive commercial development around Oshiage Station.

The base of the tower has a structure similar to a "tripod", but from a height of about 350 m and above, the tower's structure is cylindrical to withstand very strong winds.

The tower also has state-of-the-art seismic proofing including a central shaft made of reinforced concrete.

During the period from 26 October to 25 November 2007, suggestions were collected from the general public for the name to be given to the new tower. On 19 March 2008, a committee chose six final candidate names: Tokyo Edo Tower, Tokyo Sky Tree, Mirai Tree, Yume Miyagura, Rising East Tower, and Rising Tower, with the official name to be decided in a nationwide vote. It was announced on 10 June 2008 that the official name of the tower would be Tokyo Sky Tree. Tokyo Sky Tree received around 33,000 votes out of 110,000 cast, with the second most popular name being Tokyo Edo Tower.

・・・と、こんな感じですね。

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完成したら、こりゃ結構見ごたえのある建物になりそうですよねっ!
ライトアップとかもモダンでかつ幻想的になるようで、きっと日本観光の新名所として注目を集めるんでしょうね~。。。

・・・そう、「ツーリスト」が、「ツリースト」になったりして(笑)

え~、今回よりまた「通常編」に戻ります m(_ _)m
やってきたのは「秋葉原」。。。

これだけたくさん記事を書いてきてるのに、ココはやっと2回目の訪問なんですね~^^

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いつの間にか、国際都市になってしまいました。。。いろんな意味で(笑)
で、今日おじゃまするのは。。。

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「とらのあな」さんデス。
同人誌販売その他で、超有名なお店になってしまいました。
今やお客様は、世界中からいらっしゃるそうです(驚)

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・・・入りづらい(T-T)
しかも見上げると。。。

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まあ、でも話題になっているので、勇気を出してっと(←そんな大げさなのかいっ!・笑)

(撮影禁止、だそうです。。。)

・・・よく分かったような気がしなくもありません(←どっちなの!?・笑)

では本日はそのあたりを踏まえて、いつものやつを。
専門分野に造詣が深いという点に敬意を表しつつ、「オタク」さんでいってみましょう!

In modern Japanese slang, the term otaku refers to a fan of any particular theme, topic, or hobby. Common uses are anime otaku (a fan of anime), cosplay otaku and manga otaku (a fan of Japanese comic books), pasokon otaku (personal computer geeks), geemu otaku (playing video games), and wota (pronounced 'ota', previously referred to as "idol otaku") that are extreme fans of idols, heavily promoted singing girls. There are also tetsudou otaku or denshamania (railfans) or gunji otaku (military geeks).

While these are the most common uses, the word can be applied to anything (music otaku, martial arts otaku, cooking otaku, etc).

The loan-words maniakku or mania (from the English "maniac" and "mania") are sometimes used in relation to specialist hobbies and interests. They can indicate someone with otaku leanings. For example, Gundam Mania would describe a person who is very interested in the anime series Gundam. They can also describe the focus of such interests (a maniakku geemu would be a particularly underground or eccentric game appealing primarily to otaku). The nuance of maniakku in Japanese is softer and less likely to cause offense than otaku.

Some of Japan's otaku use the term to describe themselves and their friends semi-humorously, accepting their position as fans, and some even use the term proudly, attempting to reclaim it from its negative connotations. In general colloquial usage however, most Japanese would consider it undesirable to be described in a serious fashion as "otaku"; many even consider it to be a genuine insult.

An interesting modern look into the otaku culture has surfaced with an allegedly true story surfacing on the largest internet bulletin board 2channel: "Densha Otoko" or "Train Man", a love story about a geek and a beautiful woman who meet on a train. The story has enjoyed a compilation in novel form, several comic book adaptations, a movie released in June 2005, a theme song Love Parade for this movie by a popular Japanese band named Orange Range and a television series that aired on Fuji TV from June to September 2005. The drama has become another hot topic in Japan, and the novel, film and television series give a closer look into the otaku culture. In Japan its popularity and positive portrayal of the main character has helped to reduce negative stereotypes about otaku, and increase the acceptability of some otaku hobbies.

A subset of otaku are the Akiba-kei, men who spend a lot of time in Akihabara in Tokyo and who are mainly obsessive about anime, idols and games. Sometimes the term is used to describe something pertaining to the subculture that surrounds anime, idols and games in Japan. This subculture places an emphasis on certain services and has its own system for judgment of anime, dating simulations and/or role-playing games and some manga (often doujinshi) based upon the level of fanservice in the work. Another popular criterion — how ideal the female protagonist of the show is — is often characterized by a level of stylized cuteness and child-like behavior. In addition, this subculture places great emphasis on knowledge of individual key animators and directors and of minute details within works. The international subculture is influenced by the Japanese one, but differs in many areas often based upon region.

On the matter, in recent years "idol otaku" are naming themselves simply as Wota (ヲタ) as a way to differentiate from traditional otaku. The word was derived by dropping the last mora, leaving ota (オタ) and then replacing o (オ) with the identically sounding character wo (ヲ), leaving the pronunciation unchanged.

In Japan, anime is not as widely accepted and mainstream as manga. Because of this the otaku subculture has much influence over the mainstream anime industry in Japan. The area where otaku have the most influence in manga tends to be with doujinshi. Manga published in the United States are more influenced by their respective otaku subculture than they are in Japan. This is because most people who read manga have some ties to the subculture in the US, whereas in Japan manga reading is more widespread.

・・・という感じでしょうか。

いやいや、とても勉強になりました m(_ _)m
日本のサブカル文化って、ものすごいんですね~。世界中から羨望の眼差しを集めていますもんねっ!(^0^)/

通訳ガイドの方も、こういう新しい日本を感じて、世界に伝えていっていただきたいですね~。
現実にいらしているお客様の中に、こういうモノを求めている方もいらっしゃいますので。
ぜひ、この「とらのあな」さんに、おじゃましてみてください。ひょっとしたら、新しい何かが見つかるかもしれませんね。。。

・・・そう、昔から「虎穴に入らずんば・・・」って、言うじゃないですか~(笑)

いよいよ「桜2010編」も最終回。
引き続き「靖国神社」におりまして m(_ _)m

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あ~っ、「零戦」ですね~^^
そういえばココは、色んな意味で「日本人なら知っておくべき場所」の1つですもんね。

では遅ればせながら、本殿の方に向かいましょう!

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・・・結構、外国人の方がいらっしゃるんですね~(^-^)v

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そういえばこの「菊の御紋」、天皇家は十六花弁の八重菊で、皇族は十四花弁の裏菊と決められているそうなんです。。。ちなみにこれは明治憲法下で、大正15年1月21日に公布の「皇室儀制令第12条・13条」で天皇家の紋章として制定され、民間で使用すると「不敬罪」で厳しく処罰されたそうなんです。

ではこのあたりで、いつものやつを。
本日は「靖国神社」で、いってみましょう!

Yasukuni is a shrine to house the actual souls of the dead as kami, or "spirits/souls" as loosely defined in English. It is believed that all negative or evil acts committed are absolved when enshrinement occurs. This activity is strictly a religious matter since the separation of State Shinto and the Japanese Government in 1945. The priesthood at the shrine has complete religious autonomy to decide to whom and how enshrinement may occur. They believe that enshrinement is permanent and irreversible. According to Shinto beliefs, by enshrining kami, Yasukuni Shrine provides a permanent residence for the spirits of those who have fought on behalf of the emperor. Yasukuni has all enshrined kami occupying the same single seat. The shrine is dedicated to give peace and rest to all those enshrined there. It was the only place to which the Emperor of Japan bowed.

The site for the Yasukuni Shrine, originally named Tokyo Shoukonsha (東京招魂社) was chosen by order of the Meiji Emperor. This shrine was to commemorate the soldiers of the Boshin War who fought and died to bring about the Restoration. It was one of several dozen war memorial shrines built throughout Japan at that time as part of the government-directed State Shinto program. In 1879, the shrine was renamed Yasukuni Jinja. It became one of State Shinto's principal shrines, as well as the primary national shrine for commemorating Japan's war dead. The name Yasukuni, a quotation from the classical-era Chinese text Zuo Zhuan, literally means "Pacifying the Nation" and was chosen by the Meiji Emperor.

After World War II, the US-led Occupation Authorities issued the Shinto Directive. This directive ordered the separation of church and state and effectively put an end to State Shinto. Yasukuni Shrine was forced to become either a secular government institution or a religious institution independent from the Japanese government. Since in 1946, Yasukuni Shrine has continued to be privately funded and operated.

・・・という感じでしょうか。

♪♪♪~・・・あ、やっぱり「同期の桜」が聞こえてきましたね(-_-;)

で、ワタシが個人的に伝えたいのは、この曲の5番の歌詞なんです!
実は1~4番までの歌詞は、やや絶望的な内容なんですが、5番だけちょっとだけテイストが異なります。

 貴様と俺とは同期の桜
 離れ離れに散ろうとも
 花の都の靖国神社
 春の梢(こずえ)に咲いて会おう

・・・ね。

多分戻れないことは分かっているけど、毎年桜の季節になったら、またこの靖国神社で会えるよねって、再会を誓っているんです(涙) 毎年咲く靖国神社の桜は、もしかしたら「再会の喜び」なのかもしれませんね。。。

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あ、風に桜の花びらが舞い散っていきました。。。

・・・どうやら「同窓会」が、お開きになったみたいです(-人-)

通訳ガイドの皆様にお願いです!

いま、アイスランドの噴火の件で、外国からのお客様が帰国の途につけず、
日本滞在を余儀なくされていらっしゃいます。

今こそ、日本の「あたたかさ」をお見せする時だと考えます。
どうか皆様の周りで、宿泊先でお困りの外国人の方がいらっしゃいましたら、
探すのをお手伝いしてあげて頂けませんでしょうか?

下記にホテル・旅館の宿泊予約サイトのリンクを掲載させて頂きます。
どうか、お力をお貸しください!

ゆこゆこネット
じゃらん
楽天トラベル
マップルトラベル
近畿日本ツーリスト
るるぶトラベル
JTB
Yahooトラベル
スーパーホテル
一休.com
yoyaQ byカカクコム
宿バイス
ベストリザーブ
やど上手
日本旅行
トク一
J-Yado
ぐるなびトラベル
宿ぷらざ
宿予約ネット

他にもお客様のためになりそうなサイトがございましたらお知らせください。色々な形でリンク追加いたしますので。

宜しくお願いいたします! m(_ _)m

千鳥が淵を後にして、向かった先は。。。

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そう、「靖国神社」。
ココも桜の名所ですよね~^^

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日本人だけでなく、外国人の観光客も多いので、いつも混んでます(T-T)
ただ今日はまず、目的がありまして(一_一☆)

さて突然ですが、ココでクイズ(←ホント突然だねっ!・笑)
「お台場」の名前の由来は何でしょうか?

答えは、幕末に黒船の脅威から日本を守るため、徳川幕府がたくさんの砲台を設置したんですが、その「台場」があったからなんです~。。。って、結構皆さんご存知ですよねっ!

というわけで、いつものやつを。(え?早い ^-^;)
本日はそのときやって来た「ペリー提督」さんで、いってみましょう!

In 1852, Perry embarked from Norfolk, Virginia for Japan, in command of a squadron in search of a Japanese trade treaty. Aboard a black-hulled steam frigate, he ported Mississippi, Plymouth, Saratoga, and Susquehanna at Uraga Harbor near Edo on July 8, 1853. His actions at this crucial juncture were informed by a careful study of Japan's previous contacts with Western ships and what could be known about the Japanese hierarchical culture. He was met by representatives of the Tokugawa Shogunate who told him to proceed to Nagasaki, where there was limited trade with the Netherlands and which was the only Japanese port open to foreigners at that time.

Perry refused to leave and demanded permission to present a letter from President Millard Fillmore, threatening force if he was denied. Perry ordered his ships to attack several buildings around the harbor to demonstrate US naval power. The Commodore was fully prepared for more hostilities if his negotiations with the Japanese failed, and threatened to use unrestrained fire if the Japanese refused to negotiate. He sent two white flags to them, telling them to hoist the flags when they wished a bombardment from his fleet to cease and to surrender. Perry's ships were equipped with new Paixhans shell guns, capable of wreaking great destruction with every shell. The Japanese military forces could not resist Perry's modern weaponry; the term "Black Ships", in Japan, would later come to symbolise a threat imposed by Western technology.

The Japanese government was forced to let Perry come ashore to avoid further naval bombardment. Perry landed at Kurihama on July 14, 1853 presented the letter to delegates present, and left for the Chinese coast, promising to return for a reply.

Fortifications were built in Tokyo Bay at Odaiba in order to protect Edo from a possible American naval incursion.

Perry returned in February 1854 with twice as many ships, finding that the delegates had prepared a treaty embodying virtually all the demands in Fillmore's letter. Perry signed the Convention of Kanagawa on March 31, 1854 and departed, mistakenly believing the agreement had been made with imperial representatives. The agreement was made with the Shogun, the de facto ruler of Japan.

という感じですねっと。

・・・え?それがココ靖国神社と何の関係があるのかって?
実はその「砲台」が、ココにあるんです(^0^)/

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コレは・・・?

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おおおぉっ!まさにコレですねっ!(嬉)
・・・ん?まだ他にもありますね~。

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コッチもそうなんすかね?

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あ、コチラは大阪にあったやつですか~^^

何かもっと、ケースとかに入って仰々しく飾ってあるかと思ったんですが。。。野ざらしなんですねっ(汗)
子どもがお菓子食べた手で、フツーにペタペタ触ってます。。。

・・・そう「砲台」が、見ホーダイ、いたずらしホーダイ(笑)

心地よい風を浴びながら、酔い覚まし(笑)
・・・んんんっ?何かありますね w(゜0゜)w

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「門」ですか~(←少しはひねらんかい!・笑)
ではちょっと覗いてみましょうか(^-^)/

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あ、「清水門」っていうんですね~。
こんなところに、意外な旧跡があるんだぁ^^

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・・・こりゃ、かなり渋い色合いで(嬉)
で、見上げるとソコには。。。

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究極の「和」テイストです(一_一☆)
では中へと。

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「石垣」が思いっきりあります。。。てことは、「江戸城」!

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おおぉっ、何か「大名」にでもなった気分ですね。
それにしてもこの石段が。。。

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あ、やっぱり「北の丸」でした(^0^)b

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・・・いま来た道筋がぜんぶ見えます^^
では、ここから逆に「田安門」(千鳥が淵の桜ドコロ)へ抜けてみましょう!

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田安門・・・というか桜の門をくぐるように、外へ出られますね~^^
雲ひとつない青空に、桜の薄桃色が映えます!。。。やっぱりココは、桜の名所ですよね。

ではこのあたりで、いつものやつを。
本日は「北の丸公園」で、いってみましょう!

Kitanomaru Park is a part of The Imperial Palace Outer Garden, and used be a part of Edo Castle. It is located north side of the Imperial Palace. Kitanomaru Park is an important woodland garden situated in the center of Tokyo. The park which continues on into the northern part of the Imperial Palace is planted with many broadleafed evergreen trees. There are Nihon-Budoukan and Science Museum in Kitanomaru Palace. You can enjoy wild life, fish and birds in the moats and New purification System.

Kitanomaru Park district was named after an area within Edo Castle called Kitanomaru. Prior to 1969, when Kitanomaru Park was opened, this district had been called Daikancho because many daikan (local governors) lived in the place soon after the construction of Edo Castle. This place was completely destroyed by the great fire in 1657. In 1875, Higashi-Daikancho (東代官町) and Nishi-Daikancho (西代官町) were established there. In 1878, these two neighborhoods were incorporated as a district named Daikancho. Today, the name Daikancho is known as an interchange of the Inner Circular Route of the Shuto Expressway. But even today there are two great gate from Edo Castle which still preserved in great shape.

Tayasumon Gate was situated at the northern part of the old Edo Castle. Before Edo Castle was constructed, this area was a rural district, called "Tayasudai." This is a typical Masugata-mon style of gate. The exact date of construction is unknown although according to some historic literature, this gate was already existed in 1607. The present gate was re-constructed in 1636, and is the oldest remaining gate in Kokyogaien National Garden.

Shimizumon Gate is the East gate of the Kitanomaru park, and it was rebuilt in 1658. Tayasumon Gate and Shimizumon Gate were designated as the Important Cultural Assets to Japan in June 1961, and because they are remnants of Edo Castle they are of great historical importance. Both gates are managed by the Agency for Cultural Affairs.

・・・という感じでしょうか。
なるほど、さっきくぐってきた「清水門」も「田安門」も、重要文化財(重文)なんですね~。。。

・・・確かに、歴史を堪能しました。そう、十分(重文)に!(笑)

飛鳥山でたまたま知り合ったグループに、お酒をすすめられ。。。
ハイハイ、いい気分でございます~(*^q^*)

では、ほろ酔い気分で、次の場所へまいりましょう!

やってきたのは「千鳥が淵」。
ほほぉ~っ、桜が満開ですね^^

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お堀にズームインしてみると。。。

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このコントラストは、春ならではですね~(^-^)b

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水辺の桜って、なんでこんなに味わい深い「画」になるんでしょうかね???
・・・ん、ん、ん?さっきは気づかなかったんですが、あの「大きな玉ねぎ」は、「武道館」ですねっ!(嬉)
ちょっと近づいてって。。。

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お、お、お、あ、危ないっ!w(゜0゜)w
危うくお堀に落ちそうに。。。

・・・そう、お酒いただいているんで、「千鳥足」なんっすよ(笑)

ちなみに、なんで「千鳥」かっていうと、そもそも千鳥の足は、体が後ろに傾いたりしたときに支えてバランスをとる「親指」が退化してるんです。で、かつ歩くときに足もやや交差気味なんで、フラフラして不安定な感じがするところからきてるんですねっ!

ではこのあたりで、いつものやつを。
本日は「千鳥足」・・・じゃなくて。。。その原因となる「日本酒」(Sake)で。

まずは「日本酒」の製造法について、いってみましょう。

Sake is produced by the multiple parallel fermentation of rice. The rice is polished to remove the protein and oils from the exterior of the rice grains, leaving behind starch. A more thorough milling leads to fewer congeners and generally a more desirable product.

Newly polished rice is allowed to "rest" until it absorbs enough moisture from the air not to crack when immersed in water. After this resting period, the rice is washed clean of the rice powder produced during milling and is steeped in water. The length of the soak depends on the degree to which the rice was polished, from several hours or even overnight for an ordinary milling to just minutes for highly polished rice.

After soaking, the rice is boiled in a large pot or it is steamed on a conveyor belt. The degree of cooking must be carefully controlled; overcooked rice will ferment too quickly for flavors to develop well and undercooked rice will only ferment on the outside. The steamed rice is then cooled and divided for different uses.

Some of the steamed rice is taken to a culture room and inoculated with kouji mold (麹, Aspergillus oryzae). The mold-laden rice is itself known as kouji and is cultivated until the growth of the fungus reaches the desired level. This takes about two days.

When the kouji is ready, the next step is to create the starter mash, known as shubo (酒母), or colloquially, moto. Kouji rice, water, and yeast are mixed together, and in the modern method, lactic acid is added to inhibit unwanted bacteria (in slower traditional methods, lactic acid occurs naturally). Next, freshly steamed rice is added and the yeast is cultivated over 10 to 15 days (in the modern method).

When the starter mash is ready, steamed rice, water, and more kouji are added once a day for three days, doubling the volume of the mash each time. Staggering things this way allows the yeast to keep up with the increased volume. The mixture is now known as the main mash, or moromi (醪).

The main mash then ferments. This takes two to six weeks. With high-grade sake, fermentation is deliberately slowed by lowering the temperature to 10°C (50°F) or less.

Unlike malt for beer, rice for sake does not have the necessary amylase to convert starch to sugar and so must undergo a process of multiple fermentation, in which starch is converted to sugar by the kouji, and sugar is converted to alcohol by yeast. With sake these two processes happen at the same time, not as separate steps, so sake is said to be made by multiple parallel fermentation.

After fermentation, sake is pressed to separate the liquid from the solids. With some sake, a small amount of distilled alcohol, called brewer's alcohol (醸造アルコール), is added before pressing in order to extract flavors and aromas that would otherwise stay in the solids. With cheap sake, a large amount of brewer's alcohol might be added to increase the volume of sake produced. Next, the remaining lees (a fine sediment) are removed, and the sake is carbon filtered and pasteurized. The sake is allowed to rest and mature and then it is usually diluted with water to lower the alcohol content from around 20% to 15% or so, before finally being bottled.

・・・という感じでしょうか。
では続きまして、「日本酒の指定」についても少々。

The Three Types of Special Designation Sake

Honjouzou-shu (本醸造酒), in which a slight amount of brewer's alcohol is added to the sake before pressing, in order to extract extra flavors and aromas from the mash. This term was created in the late 1960s to distinguish it, a premium sake, from cheaply made liquors to which large amounts of distilled alcohol were added simply to increase volume. Sake with this designation must be made with no more than 116 liters of pure alcohol added for every 1,000 kilograms of rice.

Junmai-shu (純米酒), "pure rice sake," made from only rice, water and kouji, with no brewer's alcohol or other additives. Before 2004, the Japanese government mandated that junmai-shu must be made from rice polished down to 70% or less of its original weight, but that restriction has been removed.

Ginjou-shu (吟醸酒), made from rice polished to 60% or less of its original weight. Sake made from rice polished to 50% or lower is called daiginjou-shu (大吟醸酒).
The term junmai can be added to ginjou or daiginjou, resulting in junmai ginjou and junmai daiginjou. However, as distilled alcohol is added in small amounts to ginjou and daiginjou to heighten the aroma, not to increase volume, a junmai daiginjou is not necessarily a better product than a daiginjou made with brewer's alcohol.

・・・ですねっと。

お酒のハナシをしてると、ホント、まっすぐ帰れなくなりますよねっ!
またいい塩梅に、帰り道に都合よく「居酒屋」もありますんで。。。

・・・そう、「避け(酒)ては通れない」道(笑)

もう既に盛り上がってるトコロに来てしまった、ワタシ(T-T)
まあココは江戸時代から庶民の一大レジャーランドだったんで。。。

確かに、大きな木が多いっすね^^

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このあたりは、あの暴れん坊将軍「徳川吉宗」さんも愛した場所なんですよね~。
で、この飛鳥山のいい所は、春になると桜だけでなく、様々な花が美しいこと(^-^)

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・・・パンジーです。
ちなみに変わった品種のモノは「珍パンジー(チンパンジー)」と言うんだそうで(←ウソつけっ!・笑)

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おおっ、サクラソウもあるんですか~(嬉)

まあでも今日は、見上げてしまいますね。。。
で、このアングルがワタシの一番のお気に入りっ!

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2色の桜の「競艶」ですねっ(一_一☆)

ところで桜の代表格といえば、やっぱり「ソメイヨシノ」。
この「ソメイ」ってドコだかご存知ですか?

・・・正解は「駒込」。。。え?意外でした?

では本日はそのあたりでやってみましょうか(^0^)/~
「ソメイヨシノ」でいきましょう!

Prunus × yedoensis (Yoshino Cherry; Japanese: 染井吉野 Somei-yoshino) is a hybrid cherry of unknown origin, probably between Prunus speciosa and Prunus subhirtella. It occurs as a natural hybrid in Japan, where it has also long been cultivated in Yoshino (after which it is named) and elsewhere; it is now one of the most popular and widely planted cultivated flowering cherries (sakura) in temperate climates worldwide.

It is a small deciduous tree that at maturity grows to be 5-12 m (rarely 15 m) tall. It grows well in hardiness zones 5-8 and does well in full sun and moist but well drained soil. The leaves are alternately arranged, 6-15 cm long and 4-7 cm broad, with a serrated margin; they are often bronze-toned when newly emerged, becoming dark green by summer. The flowers emerge before the leaves in early spring; they are fragrant, 3-3.5 cm diameter, with five white or pale pink petals. The flowers grow in clusters of five or six together. The fruit, a small cherry, is a globose drupe 8-10 mm in diameter; they are an important source of food for many small birds and mammals, including robins and thrushes. The fruit contain little flesh and much concentrated red juice, which can stain clothing and brick. The fruit is only marginally sweet to the human palate.

Because of its fragrant, light pink flowers, manageable size, and elegant shape, the Yoshino Cherry is often used for ornamental purposes. Many cultivars have been selected; notable examples include 'Akebono', 'Ivensii', and 'Shidare Yoshino'.

The Yoshino cherry was introduced to Europe and North America in 1902. This tree, along with the cultivar 'Kanzan' (derived from the related Prunus serrulata), is responsible for the spectacular pink show each spring in Washington D.C. and other cities. Several of 2000 Japanese cherry trees given to the citizens of Toronto by the citizens of Tokyo in 1959 were planted in High Park.

From the Edo period to the beginning of the Meiji period, gardeners and craftsman who made the village at Somei in Edo (now Komagome, Toshima ward, Tokyo) grew Someiyoshino. They first offered them as "Yoshinozakura". But in 1900 they were renamed someiyoshino by Dr. Fujino.

・・・と、こんな感じですね。

桜って、咲いたかと思ったら、ホントすぐに散ってしまいますよね(T-T)
でもそのはかなさ、潔さが、日本人の琴線に触れるのかもしれません。

江戸時代の人々も、桜の見ごろを毎日気にかけていたんでしょうね~。。。

そう、今日か、はたまた、明日がヤマ(飛鳥山)か(笑)

え~、本日よりいよいよ「桜2010編」m(_ _)m
思えばこのブログ第1回は「六義園のしだれ桜」でしたもんね。。。2年目の春に突入デス。

で、しばし東京の桜の名所をいくつか、辿ってみたいと思います。

やってきたのは「飛鳥山」。
実はワタシが桜よりも楽しみにしてたものがありまして^^

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完成したてのエレベーター・・・その名も「アスカルゴ」(笑)
「飛鳥山」と、形状の似てる「エスカルゴ」をもじってるんですね~(一_一☆)

では乗り込みましょう\(^o^)/

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この「アスカルゴ」、今大人気で、乗るのに1時間以上待たされることもしばしば(T-T)
でも今日はすんなり乗れました~。

で、ものすごいゆっくりなスピードに(少々飽きながら・笑)頂上に到着。

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降りる人と乗る人で、ごちゃごちゃになってます(T-T)(T-T)

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・・・やっと降りられました。。。と、ソコには!

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すでにいっぱいの花見客(T-T)(T-T)(T-T)
まあ、仕方ないっスね^^

ではこのあたりで、いつものやつを。
本日は「花見の歴史」で、いってみましょう!

The practice of hanami is many centuries old. The custom is said to have started during the Nara Period (710–794) when it was ume blossoms that people admired in the beginning. But by the Heian Period (794–1185), sakura came to attract more attention and hanami was synonymous with sakura. From then on, in tanka and haiku, "flowers" meant "sakura."

Hanami was first used as a term analogous to cherry blossom viewing in the Heian era novel Tale of Genji. Whilst a wisteria viewing party was also described, from this point on the terms "hanami" and "flower party" were only used to describe cherry blossom viewing.

Sakura originally was used to divine that year's harvest as well as announce the rice-planting season. People believed in kami inside the trees and made offerings. Afterwards, they partook of the offering with sake.

Emperor Saga of the Heian Period adopted this practice, and held flower-viewing parties with sake and feasts underneath the blossoming boughs of sakura trees in the Imperial Court in Kyoto. Poems would be written praising the delicate flowers, which were seen as a metaphor for life itself, luminous and beautiful yet fleeting and ephemeral. This was said to be the origin of hanami in Japan.

The custom was originally limited to the elite of the Imperial Court, but soon spread to samurai society and, by the Edo period, to the common people as well. Tokugawa Yoshimune planted areas of cherry blossom trees to encourage this. Under the sakura trees, people had lunch and drank sake in cheerful feasts.

Today, the Japanese people continue the tradition of hanami, gathering in great numbers wherever the flowering trees are found. Thousands of people fill the parks to hold feasts under the flowering trees, and sometimes these parties go on until late at night. In more than half of Japan, the cherry blossoming period coincides with the beginning of the scholastic and fiscal years, and so welcoming parties are often opened with hanami. The Japanese people continue the tradition of hanami by taking part in the processional walks through the parks. This is a form of retreat for contemplating and renewing their spirits.

・・・という感じでしょうか。

やっぱり、日本の原風景ですよね、コレは(^-^)。。。

・・・そう、春の訪れをみんなで、「謳歌(桜花)」しましょう!(嬉)

ふと訪れた久しぶりの箱根。。。
続いてやってきたのは「芦ノ湖」デス。

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ご存知、芦ノ湖遊覧船バイキング風(笑)
子どものころ結構乗ってたんですが・・・ホント、久しぶりですね~(^0^)/

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あ、さすがに大砲は、ニセモノなんですねっ!(←本物じゃ危ないって・笑)
では乗り込みましょう。。。

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・・・で、中はというと。。。

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ひと昔前は、ほとんどの乗客がココで、「タイタニック」してました(笑)
では、いよいよ出航!

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あいにく富士山は拝めませんが、風がひんやりと心地いいっすね~^^

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こうして見ると、箱根が火山で、芦ノ湖は「カルデラ」だっていうのが、よく分かります。

んんんっ???

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・・・あんな所に「鳥居」がっ!w(゜o゜)w
これは、そのあたりに解説が必要ってことですかい?。。。

ではこのあたりで、いつものやつを。
本日はまず「箱根」から。

Hakone is the location of a noted Shinto shrine, the Hakone Gongen, which is mentioned in Heian period literature. During the Gempei War, Minamoto no Yoritomo prayed at this shrine for victory over his enemies, after his defeat at the Battle of Ishibashiyama, which was also located with the borders of present-day Hakone. As with the rest of Sagami Province, the area came under the control of the late Hojo clan of Odawara during the Sengoku period. After the start of the Edo period, Hakone-juku was a post station on the Tokaido highway connecting Edo with Kyoto. It was also the site of a major barrier and official checkpoint on the route known as the Hakone Checkpoint (箱根関所), which formed the border of the Kanto region. Under the Tokugawa shogunate, all travellers entering and leaving Edo along the Tokaido were stopped here by officials, and their travel permits and baggage was examined.

After the start of the Meiji Restoration, Hakone became a part of the short-lived Ashigara Prefecture before becoming part of Ashigarashimo District in Kanagawa prefecture in August 1876. Hakone attained town status in 1889. After merger with five neighboring towns and villages in September 1956, it reached is present boundaries.

・・・という感じでしょうか。
で、続きましてはこの「芦ノ湖」も。

Lake Ashi is a scenic lake in the Hakone area of Kanagawa Prefecture in Honshu, Japan. It is a crater lake that lies along the southwest wall of the caldera of Mount Hakone, a complex volcano. The lake is known for its views of Mt. Fuji and its numerous hot springs. Several pleasure boats and ferries traverse the lake, providing scenic views for tourists and passengers. One of the boats is a full-scale replica of a man-of-war pirate ship.

Most visitors to Lake Ashi stay in the nearby resorts or visit some of the local attractions, including taking the aerial tram Hakone Ropeway to The Great Boiling Valley. From Togendai on Lake Ashi, the Hakone Ropeway aerial tram connects to Sounzan, the upper terminus of the Hakone Tozan Cable Car funicular railway. This in turn connects to the Hakone Tozan Line mountain railway for the descent to Odawara and a connection to Tokyo by the Tokaido Shinkansen.

でございます m(_ _)m

去年1年間は、しょーもないダジャレでオチを作ることしか考えていませんでしたが、今年はもう少し高尚な締めくくり方を考えていかないと、いけないっすね~。。。

・・・そう「天下の変」と言われないうちに(笑)

さて本日よりこのブログも2年目に突入となります。
どうぞ引き続きご愛顧の程、宜しくお願いいたします m(_ _)m

で、やってきたのは、久しぶりの「箱根」。
それも「大涌谷」でございます。。。

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またしても、見えない(T-T)
「けっこうな日光編」の時も大猷院が霧でモヤっていたり・・・どうも旅先で「モヤモヤ」することが多いですね~^^

ちょっと近づいてみましょうかね。

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あ、これが正体ですねっ!
で、ココの名物といえば、もちろん「黒玉子」(^0^)b

さて、突然ですがクイズです(笑)
この黒玉子、なんであんなに真っ黒になるのでしょうか?

答えは、水温約80℃のここ大涌谷の温泉池に、玉子を入れて10~15分茹で上げますと、温泉に含まれる硫化水素と鉄分が結合し、硫化鉄となって殻に付着し自然と黒く化学変化するんです。で、食べられるようにするために、この温泉池から出したあと、さらに約100℃の湯で5分ほど蒸してあるんだそうです。

ではそのあたりも踏まえて、いつものやつを。
本日は「大涌谷」で、いってみましょう!

Owakudani is a volcanic valley with active sulfur vents and hot springs in Hakone, Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan. It is a popular tourist site for its scenic views, volcanic activity, and especially, Kuro-tamago — a local specialty of eggs hard-boiled in the hot springs. The boiled eggs turn black and smell slightly sulfuric; consuming the eggs is said to increase longevity. Eating one is said to add seven years to your life. You may eat up to two and a half for up to seventeen and a half years, but eating a whole third is said to be highly unadvised.

Access to Owakudani is via a funitel, the Hakone Ropeway. There is also a road to a visitor's center just below the Kuro-tamago hot springs site. Most visitors hike the roughly 1 kilometer trail to the actual site where the eggs are boiled to participate in the ritual egg eating. The funitel offers a stunning view of both Mount Fuji (on clear days) and the sulfur vents just below the visitor's center. Present day activities surrounding sulfur vents are the result of massive land slides in the past, construction of concrete barriers and stabilization of the area have been under way for many decades.

・・・という感じですね。

で、この出来上がった「黒玉子」を運ぶ、専用のロープウエイがあるんです。

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人間が乗るロープウエイは、ホント混雑してるんですが。。。玉子専用のコレは、スムーズで羨ましいですね~。
それにしても、玉子料理っていろいろありますが、この玉子は、Boiled Egg? Fried Egg?。。。

・・・っていうか、「Flying Egg(空飛ぶ玉子)」デスね(笑)

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