Yokoso! Japan - 通訳ガイド的日本再発見

海外から日本に来る外国人観光客の方々に、通訳ガイドの視点から、日本の良さを伝えたい…日頃見慣れた風景もあらためて見れば新鮮に映る、そんな視点で日本を再発見し、通訳ガイドの方もすぐ活用できるように、英語で紹介します。

プロフィール

ホイサムジャイ

Author:ホイサムジャイ
放浪癖あり(笑)。好きなTV番組は「モヤモヤさまぁ~ず」「ちい散歩」「タモリ倶楽部」「ぶらり途中下車の旅」などなど。。。良く言えば「自由人」、悪く言えば「鉄砲玉」(←出たら戻って来んのかい!)

最新記事

最新コメント

最新トラックバック

月別アーカイブ

カテゴリ

天気予報


-天気予報コム- -FC2-

Admin

上記の広告は1ヶ月以上更新のないブログに表示されています。
新しい記事を書く事で広告が消せます。

コメント

コメントを投稿


管理者にだけ表示を許可する
 

トラックバック

TB*URL

・・・って、何じゃこのタイトル?
実は本日やってきた場所が場所なんで。。。

ココは、通称「仏壇ストリート」!
上野から浅草方面に向かう道なんですが、何しろ仏壇・仏具屋さんが多いんです(^0^)/

butsudan_street01.jpg

・・・この先、ずっと仏具屋さんが軒を連ねているんですが、ある意味「不思議な光景」ですよね。
ウインドウショッピング、っていう感じじゃないですしね~(笑)

butsudan_street02.jpg

でも、こうしてみると、一口に「仏壇」と言っても、色んなバリエーションが存在するんですね^^

butsudan_street03.jpg

なんか、プチ寺社巡りって感じで、ちょっと楽しいかも。。。

ではこのあたりで、いつものやつを。
本日はその「仏壇」でいきましょう!

A butsudan is a shrine found in religious temples and homes of Japanese and other Buddhist cultures. A butsudan is a wooden cabinet with doors that enclose and protect a religious icon, typically a statue or a mandala scroll. The doors are opened to display the icon during religious observances. A butsudan usually contains subsidiary religious items called "butsugu," such as candlesticks, incense burners, bells, and platforms for placing offerings. Some buddhist sects place "ihai", memorial tablets for deceased relatives, within or near the butsudan.

Butsudan is a Buddhist shrine ranging from many sizes usually found in temples and homes. "Butsudan" is a Japanese word that means "Buddha's (butsu) Platform (dan)." The shrine is placed in the temple or home as a place of worship to the Buddha, the Law of the Universe, etc. Scrolls (honzon) or statues are placed in the butsudan and prayed to morning and evening. Zen Buddhists also meditate before it.

The original design for the butsudan came long before Japan itself. In India, people built altars the size of multistory buildings as an offering place to the Buddha. When Buddhism came to China and Korea, statues of the Buddha were placed on pedestals or platforms.

Storms blew the statues down and broke them (being so fragile). This was an automatic sign of disrespect. To protect the statue of the Buddha, or later scrolls, the Chinese and Koreans built walls and doors (like a closet) around it. They could then safely offer their prayers, incense, etc. to the statue or scroll without it falling and breaking.

The Japanese finally welcomed Buddhism after many years from the introduction. They took in the religion along with the Butsudan. With many new sects being formed, the Butsudan was placed in many temples. The Japanese took the plain walls and doors and elaborately decorated them. The butsudan became the focal point of every temple.

After time went on, people began having their own Butsudans installed into the home. Here they could pay respects to the Buddha, or the Law, along with the deceased. Butsudans were carried down the family line.

The arrangement and types of items on and around the Butsudan can vary depending on the sect. Frequently in the Butsudan is a statue of the Buddha or a Buddhist deity. Sometimes that is replaced with a scroll with text or an illustration of the Buddha. Other, auxiliary items associated with the Butsudan can include water and food (usually fruits or rice), an incense burner, candles and flowers or evergreens. Frequently a gong or bell is rung during recitation of prayers.

Some Buddhist sects have tablets with the names of deceased carved within or next to the Butsudan. Other Buddhist sects, such as Jodo Shinshu, usually do not have these. Other things can be found such as samurai swords, pictures of deceased, etc.

・・・という感じでしょうか。

そういえば、「仏壇」で思い出すのが、某仏具屋さんのCMで、可愛い女の子が言ってたフレーズ・・・

「手のしわとしわを合わせて、しあわせっ!南無~」
厳密にはコレ「しわわせ」デスよねっ(←ツッコミが大人げないぞっ!・笑)

まあ、くれぐれも、指の節(ふし)は止めといてください。。。
・・・そう、「ふしあわせ(不幸せ)」になりますもんね^^

そんなわけで、幸せになるために、浅草に、半被(ハッピー)を買いに行こっと(笑)
スポンサーサイト

コメント

コメントを投稿


管理者にだけ表示を許可する
 

トラックバック

TB*URL

Copyright ©Yokoso! Japan - 通訳ガイド的日本再発見. Powered by FC2 Blog. Template by eriraha.

FC2Ad

上記広告は1ヶ月以上更新のないブログに表示されています。新しい記事を書くことで広告を消せます。