Yokoso! Japan - 通訳ガイド的日本再発見

海外から日本に来る外国人観光客の方々に、通訳ガイドの視点から、日本の良さを伝えたい…日頃見慣れた風景もあらためて見れば新鮮に映る、そんな視点で日本を再発見し、通訳ガイドの方もすぐ活用できるように、英語で紹介します。

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ホイサムジャイ

Author:ホイサムジャイ
放浪癖あり(笑)。好きなTV番組は「モヤモヤさまぁ~ず」「ちい散歩」「タモリ倶楽部」「ぶらり途中下車の旅」などなど。。。良く言えば「自由人」、悪く言えば「鉄砲玉」(←出たら戻って来んのかい!)

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本日はのっけからクイズですね~。

モンゴル勢の両横綱の活躍目覚しい昨今、日本人力士の方々の「金星」に期待したいところでございます。
ご存知、両国国技館!!

入口を過ぎるとすぐに趣のある力士画に出くわしました^^
趣のある絵ですね~^^

・・・急に自分のお腹周りが気になる私(T-T)
ちなみに私はこの体型を生業にしているわけではござんせん、念のため(笑)

さて「相撲博物館」でも覗くとしましょう。
小さいながら博物館も!

名力士の肖像画や、由緒正しいグッズ(←この表現、何か軽いっすね×)、いっぱいあります。ただここは写真撮影禁止なので、外見のみで。。。

で、その相撲の決まり手ですが、いったい全部でいくつあるんでしょうか?

・・・正解は、なんと82手もあるんです!
例によってその解説をばいたしますが、何せ82もありますので、今日はココからが長いです。ご覚悟を(笑)

Kimarite are winning techniques in a sumo bout. For each bout in a Grand Sumo tournament (honbasho), a sumo referee (gyoji) will decide and announce the type of kimarite used by the winner. It is possible for the judges (shimpan) to modify this decision later. Records of the kimarite are kept and statistical information on the preferred techniques of different wrestlers can be deduced easily.

Currently the Japan Sumo Association recognises eighty-two types of kimarite, but only about a dozen are used regularly. For example, yorikiri, oshidashi and hatakikomi are frequent methods used to win bouts.

The following is a full list of kimarite:

1) Kihonwaza (Basic techniques).--- These are some of the most common kimarite in sumo.

Abisetaoshi >>
Forcing down the opponent on their back by leaning forward while in a grappling position (backward force down).

Oshidashi >>
Pushing the opponent out of the ring without holding their mawashi, nor fully extending his arms. Hand contact must be maintained through the push.(frontal push out)

Oshitaoshi >>
Pushing the opponent down out of the ring (the opponent falls out of the ring instead of backing out) without holding their mawashi. Hand contact is maintained throughout the push (front push down).

Tsukidashi >>
Thrusting the opponent backwards out of the ring with one or a series of hand thrusts. The attacker does not have to maintain hand contact (front thrust out).

Tsukitaoshi >>
Thrusting the opponent down out of the ring (the opponent falls over the edge) onto their back with a hard thrust or shove (front thrust down).

Yorikiri >>
Maintaining a grip on the opponent's mawashi, the opponent is forced backwards out of the ring (front force out).

Yoritaoshi >>
Maintaining a grip on the opponent's mawashi, the opponent is forced backwards out of the ring and collapses on their back from the force of the attack (front crush out).


2) Nagete (Throwing techniques).

Ipponzeoi >>
While moving backwards to the side, the opponent is pulled past the attacker and out of the ring by grabbing and pulling their arm with both hands (one-armed shoulder throw).

Kakenage >>
Lifting the opponent's thigh with one's leg, while grasping the opponent with both arms, and then throwing the off-balance opponent to the ground (hooking inner thigh throw).

Koshinage >>
Bending over and pulling the opponent over the attacker's hip, then throwing the opponent to the ground on their back (hip throw).

Kotenage >>
The attacker wraps their arm around the opponent's extended arm (sashite - gripping arm), then throws the opponent to the ground without touching their mawashi. A common move (armlock throw).

Kubinage >>
The attacker wraps the opponent's head (or neck) in his arms, throwing him down (headlock throw).

Nichonage >>
Extending the right (left) leg around the outside of the opponent's right (left) knee thereby sweeping both of his legs off the surface and throwing him down (body drop throw).

Shitatedashinage >>
The attacker extends their arm under the opponent's arm to grab the opponent's mawashi while dragging the opponent forwards and/or to the side, throwing them to the ground (pulling underarm throw).

Shitatenage >>
The attacker extends their arm under the opponent's arm to grab the opponent's mawashi and turns sideways, pulling the opponent down and throwing them to the ground (underarm throw).

Sukuinage >>
The attacker extends their arm under the opponent's armpit and across their back while turning sideways, forcing the opponent forward and throwing him to the ground without touching the mawashi (beltless arm throw).

Tsukaminage >>
The attacker grabs the opponent's mawashi and lifts his body off the surface, pulling them into the air past the attacker and throwing them down (lifting throw).

Uwatedashinage >>
The attacker extends their arm over the opponent's arm/back to grab the opponent's mawashi while pulling them forwards to the ground (pulling overarm throw).

Uwatenage >>
The attacker extends their arm over the opponent's arm to grab the opponent's mawashi and throws the opponent to the ground while turning sideways (overarm throw).

Yaguranage >>
With both wrestlers grasping each other's mawashi, pushing one's leg up under the opponent's groin, lifting them off the surface and then throwing them down on their side (inner thigh throw).


3) Kakete (Leg tripping techniques).

Ashitori >>
Grabbing the opponent's leg and pulling upward with both hands, causing the opponent to fall over (leg pick).

Chongake >>
Hooking a heel under the opponent's opposite heel and forcing them to fall over backwards by pushing or twisting their arm (pulling heel hook).

Kawazugake >>
Wrapping one's leg around the opponent's leg of the opposite side, and tripping him backwards while grasping onto his upper body (hooking backward counter throw).

Kekaeshi >>
Kicking the inside of the opponent's foot. This is usually accompanied by a quick pull that causes the opponent to lose balance and fall (minor inner foot sweep).

Ketaguri >>
Directly after tachi-ai, kicking the opponent's legs to the outside and thrusting or twisting him down to the dohyo (pulling inside ankle sweep).

Kirikaeshi >>
The attacker places their leg behind the knee of the opponent, and while twisting the opponent sideways and backwards, sweeps them over the attacker's leg and throws them down (twisting backward knee trip).

Komatasukui >>
When an opponent responds to being thrown and puts his leg out forward to balance himself, grabbing the underside of the thigh and lifting it up, throwing the opponent down (over thigh scooping body drop).

Kozumatori >>
Lifting the opponent's ankle from the front, causing them to fall (ankle pick).

Mitokorozeme >>
A triple attack. Wrapping one leg around the opponent's (inside leg trip), grabbing the other leg behind the thigh, and thrusting the head into the opponent's chest, the attacker pushes them up and off the surface, then throwing them down on their back (triple attack force out).

Nimaigeri >>
Kicking an off-balance opponent on the outside of their standing leg's foot, then throwing him to the surface (ankle kicking twist down).

Omata >>
When the opponent escapes from a komatsukui by extending the other foot, the attacker switches to lift the opponent's other off-balance foot and throws him down (thigh scooping body drop).

Sotogake >>
Wrapping the calf around the opponent's calf from the outside and driving them over backwards (outside leg trip).

Sotokomata >>
Directly after a nage or hikkake is avoided by the opponent, grabbing the opponent's thigh from the outside, lifting it, and throwing them down on their back (over thigh scooping body drop).

Susoharai >>
Directly after a nage or hikkake is avoided by the opponent, driving the knee under the opponent's thigh and pulling them down to the surface (rear foot sweep).

Susotori >>
Directly after a nage is avoided by the opponent, grabbing the ankle of the opponent and pulling them down to the surface (ankle pick).

Tsumatori >>
As the opponent is losing their balance to the front (or is moving forward), grabbing the leg and pulling it back, thereby ensuring the opponent falls to the surface (rear toe pick).

Uchigake >>
Wrapping the calf around the opponent's calf from the inside and forcing them down on their back (inside leg trip).

Watashikomi >>
While against the ring of the surface, the attacker grabs the underside of the opponent's thigh or knee with one hand and pushes with the other arm, thereby forcing the opponent out or down (thigh grabbing push down).


4) Hinerite (Twist down techniques).

Amiuchi >>
A throw with both arms pulling on the opponent's arm, causing the opponent to fall over forward (the fisherman's throw). It is so named because it resembles the traditional Japanese technique for casting fishing nets.

Gasshohineri >>
With both hands clasped around the opponent's back, the opponent is twisted over sideways (clasped hand twist down). See Tokkurinage.

Harimanage >>
Reaching over the opponents back and grabbing hold of their mawashi, the opponent is pulled over in front or beside the attacker (backward belt throw).

Kainahineri >>
Wrapping both arms around the opponent's extended arm and forcing him down to the dohyo by way of one's shoulder (two-handed arm twist down). (Similar to the tottari, but the body is positioned differently)

Katasukashi >>
Wrapping two hands around opponent's arm, both grasping the opponent's shoulder and forcing him down (under-shoulder swing down).

Kotehineri >>
Twisting the opponent's arm down, causing a fall (arm lock twist down).

Kubihineri >>
Twisting the opponent's neck down, causing a fall (head twisting throw).

Makiotoshi >>
Reacting quickly to an opponent's actions, twisting the opponent's off-balance body down to the dohyo without grasping the mawashi (twist down).

Osakate >>
Taking the opponent's arm extended over one's arm and twisting the arm downward, while grabbing the opponent's body and throwing it in the same direction as the arm (backward twisting overarm throw).

Sabaori >>
Grabbing the opponent's mawashi while pulling out and down, forcing the opponent's knees to the dohyo (forward force down).

Sakatottari >>
To wrap one arm around the opponent's extended arm while grasping onto the opponent's wrist with the other hand, twisting and forcing the opponent down (arm bar throw counter or "anti-tottari").

Shitatehineri >>
Extending the arm under the opponent's arm to grasp the mawashi, then pulling the mawashi down until the opponent falls or touches his knee to the dohyo (twisting underarm throw).

Sotomuso >>
Using the left (right) hand to grab onto the outside of the opponent's right (left) knee and twisting the opponent over one's left (right) knee (outer thigh propping twist down).

Tokkurinage >>
Grasping the opponent's neck or head with both hands and twisting him down to the dohyo (two handed head twist down).

Tottari >>
Wrapping both arms around the opponent's extended arm and forcing him forward down to the dohyo (arm bar throw).

Tsukiotoshi >>
Twisting the opponent down to the dohyo by forcing the arms on the opponent's upper torso, off of his center of gravity (thrust down).

Uchimuso >>
Using the left (right) hand to grab onto the outside of the opponent's left (right) knee and twisting the opponent down (inner thigh propping twist down).

Uwatehineri >>
Extending the arm over the opponent's arm to grasp the mawashi, then pulling the mawashi down until the opponent falls or touches his knee to the dohyo (twisting overarm throw).

Zubuneri >>
When the head is used to thrust an opponent down during a hineri (head pivot throw).


5) Sorite (Backwards body drop techniques).

Izori >>
Diving under the charge of the opponent, the attacker grabs behind one or both of the opponent's knees, or their mawashi and pulls them up and over backwards (backwards body drop).

Kakezori >>
Putting one's head under the opponent's extended arm and body, and forcing the opponent backwards over one's legs (hooking backwards body drop).

Shumokuzori >>
In the same position as a tasukizori, but the wrestler throws himself backwards, thus ensuring that his opponent lands first under him (bell hammer drop). The name is derived from the similarity to the shape of Japanese bell hammers.

Sototasukizori >>
With one arm around the opponents arm and one arm around the opponents leg, lifting the opponent and throwing him sideways and backwards (outer reverse backwards body drop).

Tasukizori >>
With one arm around the opponents arm and one arm around the opponents leg, lifting the opponent perpendicular across the shoulders and throwing him down (kimono-string drop). The name refers to the cords used to tie the sleeves of the traditional Japanese kimono.

Tsutaezori >>
Shifting the extended opponent's arm around and twisting the opponent behind one's back and down to the dohyo (underarm forward body drop).


6) Tokushuwaza (Special techniques).

Hatakikomi >>
Slapping down the opponent's shoulder, back, or arm and forcing them to fall forwards touching the clay (slap down).

Hikiotoshi >>
Pulling on the opponent's shoulder, arm, or mawashi and forcing them to fall forwards touching the clay (hand pull down).

Hikkake >>
While moving backwards to the side, the opponent is pulled passed the attacker and out of the ring by grabbing and pulling their arm with both hands (arm grabbing force out).

Kimedashi >>
Immobilizing the opponents arms and shoulders with one's arms and forcing him out of the dohyo (arm barring force out).

Kimetaoshi >>
Immobilizing the opponents arms and shoulders with one's arms and forcing him down (arm barring force down).

Okuridashi >>
To push an off-balance opponent out of the dohyo from behind (rear push out).

Okurigake >>
To trip an opponent's ankle up from behind (rear leg trip).

Okurihikiotoshi >>
To pull an opponent down from behind (rear pull down).

Okurinage >>
To throw an opponent from behind (rear throw down).

Okuritaoshi >>
To knock down an opponent from behind (rear push down).

Okuritsuridashi >>
To pick up the opponent by his mawashi from behind and throw him out of the dohyo (rear lift out).

Okuritsuriotoshi >>
To pick up the opponent by his mawashi from behind and throw him down on the dohyo (rear lifting body slam).

Sokubiotoshi >>
Pushing the opponent's head down from the back of the neck (head chop down).

Tsuridashi >>
While wrestlers face each other, to pick up the opponent by his mawashi and deliver him outside of the dohyo (lift out).

Tsuriotoshi >>
While wrestlers face each other, to pick up the opponent by his mawashi and slam him onto the dohyo. (lifting body slam).

Ushiromotare >>
While the opponent is behind the wrestler, to back up and push him out of the dohyo (backward lean out).

Utchari >>
When near the edge of the dohyo, to bend oneself backwards and twist the opponent's body until he steps out of the dohyo (backward pivot throw).

Waridashi >>
To push one foot of the opponent out of the ring from the side, extending the arm across the opponent's body and using the leg to force him off balance (upper-arm force out).

Yobimodoshi >>
Reacting to the opponent's reaction to the attacker's inside pull, the attacker pulls them off by grabbing around them around the waist, before throwing them down (pulling body slam).

Hiwaza >>
Non-techniques: There are five ways in which a wrestler can win without employing a technique.

Fumidashi >>
The opponent accidentally takes a backward step outside the ring with no attack initiated against him (rear step out).

Isamiashi >>
In the performance of a kimarite the opponent inadvertently steps too far forward and places a foot outside the ring. (forward step out).

Koshikudake >>
The opponent falls over backwards without a technique being initiated against him. This usually happens because he has over-committed to an attack. (inadvertent collapse).

Tsukihiza >>
The opponent stumbles and lands on one or both knees without any significant prior contact with the winning wrestler (knee touch down).

Tsukite >>
The opponent stumbles and lands on one or both hands without any significant prior contact with the winning wrestler (hand touch down).

・・・以上でございます。・・・いやいや、本当に多くて大変でした。

はっけよ~い、のこった!のこった!疲れが残った!(笑)
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